Plantar Fasciitis Flat Feet

March 30, 2011 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

There’s long been a debate among the medical community about what exactly causes plantar fasciitis.  Some medical professionals point the finger at high arches, while others go totally the other way and say it’s because of flat feet.  So which is the cause of plantar fasciitis pain, high arches or flat feet?

Simply put, the problem lies with the doctors themselves.  It’s not uncommon for a medical doctor, physiotherapist or even podiatrist to point the finger at “your high arches”, and you could literally walk down the street to another professional and they will say exactly the opposite, “You’ve got flat feet”.

So one has to ask, why does it seem that doctors are always contradicting each other?  How can sufferers ever learn how to treat plantar fasciitis successfully so the pain is gone for good?

The answer is that both high arches and flat feet can cause the pain associated with plantar fasciitis.  So the lesson here is that you can suffer from plantar fasciitis if you have high arches or even if you have flat feet.  If you have too high of an arch in your foot
the fascia does not stretch enough and may draw too much force to fast.  As a result the fascia becomes inflamed and irritated over time.

So what should you do if you have flat feet and plantar fasciitis?  What other plantar fasciitis symptoms should you be aware of?

To be straight up front with you, one former plantar fasciitis to another,  plantar fasciitis will not go away without an effective plan of attack.  How many times have you ever thought to yourself, “my feet must be taking a beating” or “I need to take better care of my feet?”

I’m willing to bet the only time is has ever crossed your mind is when you slowed down to take a rest and your feet started throbbing, right? We pretty much ignore them and expect them to get us from point A to B, everyday without thought or hesitation. If we do work them a little harder than usual we expect them to heal and be ready to go the next day.

If you’ve tried taking a break from the activities that caused your plantar fasciitis and it’s done nothing to stop the pain, then it’s time to go that extra step but…

You don’t have to shell out hundreds of dollars of your hard earned cash on doctors or podiatrists visits.  You don’t have to waste your money on custom orthotic shoes or inserts.  Forget getting painful cortisone injections in your feet.  No need to spend a small fortune on custom shoe inserts or insoles either!

All it really takes to completely eliminate your stubborn and nagging foot pain for good are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do from the comfort of your own living room, sitting in your comfy chair watching your favorite television show – without any special exercise equipment or gadgets!

plantar fasciitis flat feet tips

Plantar Fasciitis Diagnosis

March 25, 2011 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

When it comes to any type of diagnosis of an illness or injury, it’s always best for a medical doctor to provide this information.  But what if you can’t get to a doctor right away and you’ve searched high and low for information on plantar fasciitis or foot pain.  Well, even though I am not a medical doctor, this is what a plantar fasciitis diagnosis would look like from my end.

For many sufferers of plantar fasciitis, the most commonly reported symptoms are a strong burning (as if someone is holding a match to the bottom of your foot) or sharp pain in the arch of the foot, usually close to the heel. You may also experience pain behind your toes, and sometimes across the bottom of your foot. Plantar fasciitis sufferers most frequently report pain after short periods of rest and can be the most painful when you awake in the morning but the pain may start to subside as your feet warm up.

The most common and sure sign of plantar fasciitis is painful feet in the morning. If you catch yourself frequently saying to yourself in the morning, “My feet are killing me”, there is significant possibility that you suffer from plantar fasciitis.

It’s not uncommon for plantar fasciitis sufferers to describe the muscle knots and cramps in the foot itself as more of a source of their pain and suffering than the actual swelling and inflammation of the foot fascia.  If you are on your feet for an extended period of time than you are accustomed to, or walk or run on different terrain than you normally would, you may entice a bout of plantar fasciitis.  Plantar fasciitis pain will usually flare up and be at its worst usually the day after these rare occurrences.

As with any injury or condition, in this case plantar fasciitis, avoidance of the injury may result in a worsening progression of the condition and may eventually get so bad and painful that you may need crutches and supports to make it off your couch to the kitchen, bathroom or bedroom. You may feel totally helpless and dependent on others.

Irregardless of the severity of your plantar fasciitis pain, you can rehabilitate it and cure it by applying how to cure plantar fasciitis simple strategies that I will teach you. Even if you’ve been suffering with foot pain for several years, don’t give up. The secret to successful treatment is not necessarily the most expensive therapy.

The majority of foot pain sufferers can cure it on their own with some guidance and armed with the correct, effective techniques – such as plantar fasciitis home treatment.

So if you’re completely fed up with your nagging and stubborn foot pain, all it really takes are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do from the comfort of your own living room while sitting in your comfy chair watching your favorite television show – without any special exercise equipment or gadgets!

diagnosing plantar fasciitis

Bottom of Foot Pain

January 28, 2011 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

In my 12 plus years in the Personal Fitness Training and Exercise Rehabilitation fields, I can honestly say that one of the most common types of “pain” that is frequently reported by clients is bottom of foot pain.  Why?  Simply because we’re on our feet everyday, it’s hard to give them a much needed rest when the bottom of our feet become painful and even throb.

For many foot pain sufferers, they simply think that if you spend much of your day on your feet, having foot pain is normal.  This is not always the case.  In my opinion, over 70% of all foot pain can be attributed to a repetitive strain injury called plantar fasciitis.  It can affect anyone at any age.

So what are the likely causes of plantar fasciitis and pain in the bottom of your foot/feet?

Before we learn about plantar fasciitis causes, it’s important to learn more about this painful foot condition called plantar fasciitis.  Plantar fasciitis is commonly described as pain and inflammation on the bottom of the foot/feet.  To be more specific, inflammation of the plantar fascia of the foot.  The fascia is thin fibrous band of tissue that attaches at your heel bone and runs along the bottom of your foot and attaches at the base of the toes.

What strikes many plantar fasciitis as strange is that the bottom of their foot is rarely tender to the touch.  It’s not until the foot actually bears weight that the real pain strikes and sets in.

Plantar fasciitis is normally not a condition that develops overnight.  It is a repetitive strain injury which means that your foot endures repeated strain and pressure over a period of time until finally an injury to one of the tissues in your foot occurs.  And in the case of plantar fasciitis, it’s the foot fascia the begins to develop tiny, micro tears.  When the fascia does not get the proper rest or care to repair and heal, it’s then that it becomes irritated and inflamed causing severe pain and discomfort.

The top causes of bottom foot pain and plantar fasciitis include:

  • an increase in physical activity
  • changes to normal foot biomechanics due to changes in surfaces that you normal run or jog on
  • shoes that do not provide enough support for surfaces that you stand on everyday
  • being overweight
  • existing muscle imbalances from the foot, all the way up your leg and into your buttocks
  • poor shoe support

These are just a few of the most common causes of plantar fasciitis and bottom of foot pain.

So now that you know that you’re suffering from an actually injury and not just ‘normal’ foot pain, what is the best and fastest way on how to treat plantar fasciitis?  It’s actual much simpler and easier than you think.

Well as someone who has suffered from plantar fasciitis, I can honestly tell you that you don’t have to shell out hundreds of dollars of your hard earned cash to doctors or podiatrists.  You definitely don’t have to wash down fistfuls of anti-inflammatory pills on a daily basis to mask the pain.  Forget about having to get painful cortisone injections or shots in your feet.

To be straight up front with you, all it really takes to completely cure plantar fasciitis and stop the pain on the bottom of your feet are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do from the comfort and convenience of your own living room without any special exercise equipment or gadgets!

how to stop bottom of foot pain

How To Cure Plantar Fasciitis

January 21, 2011 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

The most commonly reported type of foot injury, plantar fasciitis, does not discriminate on age or gender.  In fact, this repetitive strain injury can affect anyone at anytime.  But for those who suffer from this nagging injury, their most important question is how to cure plantar fasciitis.  And preferably in the shortest possible time.

Before we jump into the best way to cure plantar fasciitis, we need to learn more about this stubborn yet debilitating injury.

Plantar fasciitis is a painful intolerable inflammation of the heel wherein a person develops severe pain from the base of the toes  along the bottom of the arch and into the heel.  It is commonly reported by runners and also people who are prone to a lot of physical exercises like walking, running and heightened durations of standing in one spot.

There are many potent causes of plantar fasciitis like an anomaly in the structure of a person’s feet, which can make him more vulnerable to feet inflammation.  Moreover, due to a deformity or imbalance in the bio mechanical composition of the feet, calves, hamstrings or buttocks can cause agonizing pain all the way back to the heels.  One of the classic signs of plantar fasciitis is morning heel pain.

Another relevant reason for plantar fasciitis is wearing poorly structured shoes, which fail to provide an important buffer to your heels and foot arch.  As a result, the shoes can lead to an imbalanced exertion of pressure on the wearer’s arch and ball of the feet.

Excessive weight gain during a short period of time can also lead to the suffering of plantar fasciitis. There are many kinds of effective plantar fasciitis exercises, which can be very effectual in relieving your foot pain, if done properly.  Yet sufferers still are not aware of how to treat plantar fasciitis at home.

The application of ice to the swelled area for a minimum duration of 10-15 minutes at least three times a day can help get rid of the throbbing foot pain.

The use of NSAID’s Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen can also help in lessening of piercing pain. Moreover,  doctors will also suggest some plantar fasciitis stretches, which can help decrease your foot cramps.  The best way to heal yourself from plantar fasciitis is to refrain from any kind of physical activity that puts a lot of pressure on your feet.

Plantar fasciitis, although may seem like a minor problem initially, but, it leads to a lot of discomfort by depriving a person of any kind of movement and making them feel helpless and dependent on others for basic needs.

But the real cure for plantar fasciitis is actually quite simple.

All it really takes to completely cure plantar fasciitis are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do from the comfort of your own living room while watching your favorite television show – without any special exercise equipment or gadgets!

 

It’s free!

Plantar Fasciitis Arch Pain

January 11, 2011 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

For many plantar fasciitis sufferers, heel pain is only one symptom that they have to contend with on a daily basis.  But when the plantar fasciitis arch pain strikes, it can be so bad that it literally brings you to your knees begging for relief.

Before we get into exactly why you have arch pain, it’s important to learn more about plantar fasciitis and why it’s such a stubborn injury to overcome.

Plantar fasciitis is commonly described as pain and inflammation in the sole of the foot.  For the medically inclined, the term “itis” is means inflammation and plantar refers to the plantar aponeurosis or bottom of the foot.  The plantar fascia is a thin fibrous band that attaches at the heel bone and runs along the bottom of the foot to attach at the base of the toes.

The strangest thing about plantar fasciitis is that the bottom of your foot is almost never tender to the touch but it’s not until the arch of your foot receives pressure(ie: when you stand) that you actually experience pain and discomfort.

So what exactly causes plantar fasciitis and how can you best treat it?

Plantar fasciitis is not an injury that develops overnight.  It is a repetitive strain injury that develops over an extended period of time that is brought on by several factors that include:

  • Being overweight
  • an increase in physical fitness
  • acute trauma to the feet(very rare)
  • standing in one place on a hard surface for extended periods of time
  • not wearing the proper footwear for surface/ground conditions
  • muscle imbalances anywhere along the kinetic chain that runs from your foot all the way up to your buttocks
  • weak foot/ankle muscles

If you can relate to any of the above situations, then these are the most likely cause of your plantar fasciitis arch pain.

The repeated stresses, wear and tear on your foot fascia causes small micro tears on the fascia and arch of the foot.  Because we need to be on our feet daily, your feet seem to never get the rest they need in order to heal properly.  This is when inflammation and swelling of plantar fascia and arch occurs.

When these structures of the foot are inflamed they tend to shorten in length which gives you that tight pulling sensation in the bottom of your foot and across the arch of your foot.  The natural shape of your foot arch is like a bow.  The small micro tears and swelling of your fascia distorts the natural shape of the arch of your foot and and as a result your feel pain.

So what’s your best options for plantar fasciitis foot arch pain treatment?

To be brutal honest with you and up front, you don’t have to shell put hundreds of dollars of your hard earned cash on custom orthotic shoes, spend time sitting in a doctors or podiatrists office, or getting invasive cortisone shots/injections in your feet.

In fact – all it really takes to completely eliminate your plantar fasciitis and painful foot arch are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can while sitting in the comfort and convenience of your own living room without any special exercise equipment or gadgets!

arch pain plantar fasciitis

Foot Aches and Pains

December 14, 2010 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

It’s not uncommon to experience some foot aches and pains if you spend many hours on your feet one day, which is not normally part of your everyday routine.  For others, foot pain and foot aches is a harsh reality that sometimes can bring you to your knees.  And then there is the ever so painful foot throbbing and cramps at night that prevents you from getting a good nights sleep.

So what is exactly happening when your foot aches and pains?

The majority of foot pain and aches can be attributed to inflammation of the plantar fascia of the foot.  The foot fascia is a thin fibrous band of tissue that attaches at the heel bone and runs along the bottom of your foot and connects again at the base of your toes.

If you’ve had foot pain and aching for more than 5 days, then there is a good chance that you are not suffering from “normal” foot pain but you’ve actually injured your foot.  It’s a condition that is the most commonly reported type of repetitive strain injury for the foot called plantar fasciitis.  The strange thing about this foot injury is that the majority of sufferers do not report pain or tenderness on the bottom of the foot when they touch their foot.  It’s not until the foot actually bears weight that the real pain and aching is felt in the deeper tissues of the foot.

Overtime repeated stresses, wear and tear on the foot fascia causes small, micro tears that directly causes foot pain and aches.  Due to the lack of rest and chance to heal properly, your plantar fascia begins to swell and become irritated. To make matters worse, your body’s natural defense mechanism when injury occurs is to lay down adhesive tissues across the inflamed tissues.  This is more commonly known as “scar-tissue”.  The laying down of scar tissue causes the plantar fascia is tighten up and restrict which in turn prolongs the pain and suffering of plantar fasciitis.

So what can cause plantar fasciitis?

Below are some of the most common causes of plantar fasciitis:

  • weak foot muscles
  • being overweight
  • high arches or flat feet
  • poor shoe support
  • excessive foot pronation
  • increase in physical activity
  • standing on hard surfaces in one place for extended periods of time

If you can relate to any of the above causes, then this is most likely the cause of your plantar fasciitis, foot aches and pain.

So what’s your best option on how to treat plantar fasciitis and stop foot pain and aches?

As someone who suffered from plantar fasciitis, I can tell you that curing foot aches, pain and plantar fasciitis is actually quite simple.  You don’t have to waste hundreds of dollars of your hard earned cash on doctors, podiatrists, custom orthotic shoes, or cortisone shots.  All they will do is take away your money and not your pain!

All it really takes to completely cure your foot pain and plantar fasciitis are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do from the comfort of home while sitting in your comfy chair watching your favorite television show – without any special exercise equipment or gadgets!

why foot aches and pains

Center Heel Pain

November 26, 2010 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

Do you experience heel pain when you take the first few steps out of bed in the morning?  Are you experiencing a dull ache or sharp pain in your heel on a daily basis?  Do you have heel pain in the center when you place weight on your foot?

If you can relate to any of the above questions but more importantly can reply with ‘Yes’, then there is a good chance you are suffering from the most common type of foot injury called plantar fasciitis.  But don’t worry, you’re not alone!

The problem with plantar fasciitis is that it gets commonly misdiagnosed as heel spurs.  The implications as a result of this misdiagnosis usually leads to inappropriate treatment methods that only results in the patient having to suffer even longer with no foot and heel pain relief in sight.

Heel spurs actually only develop after you’ve suffered your plantar fasciitis injury.  They are bony, spike like projections that grow from the heel but don’t cause pain.  They can only be seen on an x-ray and are simply a side effect of plantar fasciitis.

So what exactly is plantar fasciitis, how did you suffer this injury and more importantly how do you eliminate your center heel pain?

Plantar fasciitis is the swelling and inflammation of the plantar fascia of the foot.  The fascia is a thin band of fibrous tissue that connects at the heel bone and runs along the bottom of your foot and attaches at the base of your toes.  The strange thing about plantar fasciitis is that if you touch or press on the bottom of your foot, you feel no pain or discomfort.  It’s not until you place your weight on your foot do you feel the sharp pain and burning sensations.  Many sufferers also complain of foot pain in arch combined with foot pain in the morning.

What are the likely causes of plantar fasciitis?

Below are the 7 most common causes of plantar fasciitis:

  1. Weak foot muscles
  2. An increase in physical activities or sports
  3. Flat or very high foot arches
  4. Excessive foot pronation
  5. Standing in one place on hard surfaces for extended periods of time
  6. Poor shoe support
  7. Being overweight

There are also specific actions that put you at a higher risk of developing this nagging and stubborn injury.  Activities that include running, walking, playing football, soccer and hiking.  There are also occupations where you are more prone to developing plantar fasciitis such as cashiers, hairdressers, postal workers, factory workers and nurses.

So now that you know that you are indeed suffering from plantar fasciitis, the worse thing you can do is take the wait and see approach.  The biggest mistake that most plantar fasciitis sufferers make is hoping that somehow, someway their foot pain will magically disappear on it’s own.  Nothing could be further from the truth.

In fact, your plantar fasciitis pain and symptoms will only get worse the longer you wait to treat it!

As someone who spent over $700 on so called ‘traditional’ treatment methods for plantar fasciitis but they all failed.  You don’t have to shell out your hard earned cash on doctors and podiatrist visits, pop anti-inflammatory pills that really only mask your pain, or spend a fortune on custom orthotic shoes.

All it really takes to completely eliminate your center heel pain and cure plantar fasciitis once for all are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do from the comfort of home without any special exercise equipment or gadgets!

heel pain center help

Burning Pain Heel of Foot

November 23, 2010 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

It’s not uncommon to experience foot or heel pain if we spend hours on our feet one day maybe sightseeing, hiking or when we’re on vacation.  But what if this foot and heel pain does not disappear after a day or two?  Perhaps it gets worse and you start to experience burning pain in your heel and throbbing foot pain.  If so, you may be suffering from a more serious type of foot injury and not just “everyday” foot pain.

It’s important not to take this burning pain in your heel lightly, as with most types of foot injuries, they tend to get worse over time if proactive measures are not taken to help relieve the pain and identify it’s source.

But to be 100 percent sure that you are suffering from the condition I believe you have, there are 4 important questions that need to be answered:

  1. Do you feel a pulling sensation in your heel from time to time?
  2. Do you experience pain in the center of your heel when you place your weight on your foot?
  3. Are you feeling heel pain when you take the first few steps out of bed in the morning?
  4. Do you experience a dull aching, sharp or burning sensation in your heel?

If you can relate to any of the above symptoms and can answer “YES” to any of these 4 questions, I’m confident to say that you are suffering from the most common type of foot injury called plantar fasciitis.

So what exactly is plantar fasciitis?  Plantar fasciitis is basically inflammation and irritation on the plantar fascia of the foot.  The plantar fascia is a thin band of fibrous tissue that runs from your heel along the bottom of your foot and connects at the base of your toes.  For the majority of plantar fasciitis sufferers, when you touch the bottom of your foot or heel it won’t feel tender or sore.  It’s not until you actually put weight on your foot is when the pain increases.

Plantar fasciitis is not an injury that usually develops over night rather it develops over a period of time.  It’s a repetitive stress injury which means the soft tissues break down from excessive strain and wear from repeated activities and actions.

There are specific groups of individuals who are considered the high risk category for developing plantar fasciitis.  They include but are not limited too:

  • Nurses
  • Football players
  • Runners
  • Postal workers
  • Cashiers
  • Walkers
  • Factory workers
  • Hairdressers

It’s also important to learn that there are many different causes of plantar fasciitis.  These causes can include:

  • Being overweight
  • Poor shoe support
  • Flat or extremely high arches
  • Excessive foot pronation
  • Situations that require standing on hard surfaces
  • Weak foot muscles
  • An increase in physical activity

So what should you do if you suffer from plantar fasciitis?  What are your best treatment options?

Well, as someone who’s walked a mile in your shoes and knows exactly what you are going through.  I can tell you that you don’t have to waste hundreds of dollars of your hard earned cash on expensive podiatrist or doctor visits, there’s absolutely no need to go out and buy custom orthotic shoes and you never have to worry about getting painful cortisone injections or having to face the knife wielding surgeon.

All it really takes to completely cure your plantar fasciitis and stop the burning pain in your heel and foot are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do from the comfort of home without any special exercise equipment or gadgets!

 

It’s free!

Pulling Sensation In Heel

November 19, 2010 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

For many of us, it takes a lot for us to slow down when we feel any type of pain in our body.  We tend to simply ignore the pain and hope ‘it’s’ nothing, it will pass’.  But when we feel pain in our feet, it’s sometimes hard to overlook simply because we spend so much time on our feet each and every day.  What if you all of a sudden feel a pulling sensation in your heel and maybe some throbbing pain? This is something you shouldn’t just ignore, here’s why.

There’s no arguing that out feet take a pounding day after day.  We hardly ever think twice about the type of shoes we wear, except for ‘does this match my outfit’?  We always opt for style over comfort.  But this can only last so long.  We expect our feet to simply be indestructible without ever giving them any TLC.  So when your feet start to ache, pain or you feel a pulling sensation in the heel, its’ REALLY time to take notice.

This pulling sensation in the heel of your foot is most likely a repetitive stress injury called plantar fasciitis.  Plantar fasciitis is the most commonly reported type of foot problem that affects millions of people each and every year.  It is described as pain and inflammation of the plantar fascia.  A tell tale sign of this nagging foot condition is morning heel pain when you take the first few steps out of bed.  The plantar fascia is a thin fibrous tissue band that runs from your heel along the bottom of your foot and attaches at the base of the toes.

It’s not unusual for patients suffering from plantar fasciitis to feel a pulling sensation in their heel.  The swelling, inflammation and small micro tears in the foot fascia that’s associated with plantar fasciitis causes the plantar fascia to shorten which gives you that pulling sensation in your heel.

Plantar fasciitis is not a condition that usually develops overnight.  It normally develops over a long period of time and can affect anyone at any age.  Below are some common reasons why you feel a pulling sensation in your heel and how your plantar fascia may have been damaged:

  1. You’ve recently increased your physical activity.
  2. You may have other existing soft tissue injuries ranging from your foot all the way up to your hamstring.
  3. Although not as common but blunt force trauma or a sharp blow to the bottom of your foot.
  4. Performing repetitive motions that cause stress in the soft tissues in the feet and legs.
  5. Wearing shoes that do not provide the right type of foot support for your job or physical activities.
  6. Already existing muscle imbalances anywhere along the kinetic chain from your foot all the way up to your buttocks.
  7. A change in normal foot motions due to physical activities such as running on uneven ground when you are used to running on flat, pavement or concrete paths.
  8. Standing on hard surfaces for extended periods of time with minimal foot movement.

If any of the above statements sound familiar to you, then this is the most likely cause of your plantar fasciitis and heel pain.  Over time they can cause the very small yet painful micro tears in your plantar fascia.  Without the proper type of treatment, your plantar fasciitis pain, inflammation and swelling will get worse!  Take it from me, I know!  I literally went an entire summer without a tan because my plantar fasciitis was so bad.

So what’s the best way to stop the pulling sensation in your heel and eliminate your plantar fasciitis pain for good?

All it really takes to cure your nagging and stubborn foot pain once and for all are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do from the comfort of home without any special exercise equipment while watching your favorite television show!

 

It’s free!

Foot Pain In Arch of the Foot

November 16, 2010 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

It’s not uncommon for just about everyone from time to time to experience foot pain in the arch of the foot.  Especially after spending hours on your feet or maybe after you’ve just started running again after some time off.  But what if the foot pain in the arch of your foot simply came on out of nowhere for no apparent reason?

Regardless of how you developed this foot pain in the arch of your foot, you maybe suffering from the most common type of foot injury which is commonly known as plantar fasciitis.  So what exactly is plantar fasciitis and how do you treat and cure this painful, stubborn and nagging injury?

Plantar fasciitis is commonly described as pain and inflammation of plantar fascia of the foot.  The plantar fascia usually becomes inflamed, irritated and swollen from standing on your feet for extended periods of time, running or wearing high heels.

A layer of connective tissue, the plantar fascia, medically referred to as plantar aponeurosis, spans across the arch of your foot, from your heel to toes.  Plantar fasciitis pain is usually the result of excessive strain on the foot and frequent irritation of the arch and fascia.

If we look at the foot, the arch is the bow; the plantar fascia is the string of the bow.  The fascia of the foot combined with multiple muscles in the leg and foot support the arch and makes it elastic and flexible.

When the arch of the foot becomes to elastic and stretches out, your foot may bottom out on the floor, resulting in the lengthening and expansion of the plantar fascia.  If your arch is not flexible enough, then the fascia holds too much weight too fast.  The result is the flaring and inflammation of your plantar fascia.

The internet is a wash with misdiagnoses of every different ailment and illness; some good, reputable sources and some not so good.  As a society, we’d love nothing more than to alleviate all of our medical problems or pain simply by popping a pill and all our troubles, pain and worry would be gone!

When we start looking at the root cause of plantar fasciitis, the possibilities are numerous and can be complex to identify.  At times, it can even be difficult for the medical professionals to properly identify and diagnosis the exact combinations of body and foot movements that is causing the plantar fasciitis and foot pain in your arch.

But here’s the good news if you are suffering from foot pain in the arch of your foot and plantar fasciitis.  You don’t have to shell out hundreds of dollars of your hard earned cash for expensive podiatrist and doctor visits, or spend your cash on outrageously priced custom orthotic shoes and inserts.

All it really takes to completely eliminate your foot arch pain and completely cure your plantar fasciitis are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do from the comfort of your own living room without the need for any special exercise equipment or gadgets!

treat foot pain in arch

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