Plantar Fasciitis X Ray

June 11, 2011 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

With the explosion of the internet, many websites have set out to replace medical professionals when it comes to diagnosing injuries and disease.  Some websites actually have Medical doctors who are more than happy to answer your questions and give advice.  But it’s always best practice to visit your own GP if you are suffering from any sort of pain or discomfort.  And if possible, get an x ray.

This is no different when it comes to a plantar fasciitis diagnosis which will put any to rest any concerns or doubts you have of whether your foot pain really is a plantar fasciitis injury or something more serious like a broken bone.

Requesting a plantar fasciitis x ray is critical if you ever want to fully recover from plantar fasciitis simply because it allows you to take the “first step” to set out on a proper path to get your foot pain under control once and for all.

Many people who suffer from plantar fasciitis continue suffering from this nagging injury much longer than they should, and I’m sorry to say but a lot of the blame can be pointed at the people who are supposed to help – the medical community.  Here’s why…

Some medical professionals are still using the term heel spurs synonymously to describe plantar fasciitis.  This sends a confusing message to those who are suffering from plantar fasciitis, when all it is they are seeking when their foot pain first strikes is a proper diagnosis.

The truth be told about heel spurs is that they are simply a side effect of plantar fasciitis.  Other important facts about heel spurs is that they are “spike-like” projections of new bone that grows out from your heel that rarely cause pain or discomfort.  Heel spurs can even remain at the back of your heel bone even after your plantar fasciitis has been cured and resolved.  You will only develop these spiky projections after you’ve developed plantar fasciitis.  Heel spurs are rarely felt by rubbing your fingers at the back of your heel rather they can only be identified through an x ray.

To make matters worse when trying to get a proper plantar fasciitis diagnosis is that doctors often contradict each other when it comes to your foot arch.  It’s not uncommon for one doctor to tell you that you have “flat feet” and this is the cause of your plantar fasciitis pain.  Then you could literally walk down the street to another doctor and they will tell you that you have “high arches” and that this is why you have plantar fasciitis.  To be brutally honest, both types of foot shapes are equally at risk of developing plantar fasciitis foot pain.

The real secret behind eliminating plantar fasciitis is taking proactive measures to treat it as soon as you are diagnosed.  Plantar fasciitis walking pain is real and this when you really need to bear down and get treatment.  The longer you take to seek treatment to the longer your recovery may take.  Not to mention that as you ignore the pain and put off getting treatment, you may actually be making your injury worse, which in turn will increase your pain and symptoms.

Many people who have had a recent plantar fasciitis xray, diagnosis or may have been suffering from this terrible, stubborn foot injury for some time, don’t even realize that plantar fasciitis home treatment exists.  You don’t have to shell out hundreds of dollars for doctors, x-rays, podiatrists, custom orthotic shoes or inserts to get immediate foot pain relief.

In fact, you don’t even have to get up from the chair you are sitting on right now to get foot pain relief.  All it takes are 5 simple, easy-to-follow steps that you can do at home without any special exercise equipment or medical gadgets.

Yes, it is that easy!  Simply click on the button below and let me show you just how easy it is!

 

It’s free!

Plantar Fasciitis Walking

June 7, 2011 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

plantar fasciitis walkingWe all suffer from foot pain from time to time.  Whether it is a direct result of walking around spending hours at an amusement park during the summer or shopping till you drop, it’s not uncommon for your feet to throb and pain when you get home.

But what if your foot pain does not go away in a day or two?  What if you’ve developed  the most common type of foot injury – plantar fasciitis?  And now just walking or putting weight on your feet, feels like someone is stabbing the bottom of your feet with a knife.  Should you be concerned?

The truth be told, you should be worried.  Especially if your foot pain has not gone away after 48 hours, you’ve tried plantar fasciitis stretches and simply walking now causes great discomfort and pain anywhere from your heel to the base of your toes.

It’s not uncommon to suffer from plantar fasciitis just from walking around day in and day out.  There can be many reasons why you have developed a plantar fasciitis injury.  Some common causes of plantar fasciitis can include: being overweight, standing on hard surfaces for extended periods of time – in one place, wearing improper shoes for the surface that you walk, run or stand on day in and day out, or already existing muscle imbalances anywhere from your achilles tendon all the way up your leg to your hamstrings and buttocks.

Many plantar fasciitis sufferers not only find the foot pain unbearable but also the accompanying swelling, inflammation and foot throbbing.  There are 4 simple techniques that can help decrease your pain, swelling and inflammation – even better, it’s plantar fasciitis home treatment.  These techniques are called the R.I.C.E. principles.  Let’s learn exactly how you can implement these techniques right now.

R stands for Rest.  As with any kind of injury, especially a repetitive strain injury such as plantar fasciitis,  if possible give your feet a most needed rest in order to reduce the swelling and inflammation.

I stands for ICE.  Applying ice directly to your injured foot will immediately decrease the degree of swelling due to a process known as vasoconstriction.  This occurs due to the sudden drop in temperature of the fascia and constrction of blood vessels.

C stands for COMPRESSION.  Simply wrap your foot in an elastic bandage or elastic support.  The compress will provide support for your injured plantar fascia.  The compress will also provide temporary pain relief.

Last but no least E stands for ELEVATE.  Elevating your injured foot will reduce the rush of blood into the foot fascia.   This will in turn prevent any swelling or inflammation that is present as you go through the healing process.

The RICE principles are always the method of choice when dealing with repetitive strain injuries, especially when you’ve first incurred an injury.  I recommend you implement these 4 simple steps to help decrease your plantar fasciitis pain from walking.

Now as someone who knows the real how stubborn and nagging plantar fasciitis can be.  I don’t want you to make the same mistakes that I did when trying to cure your plantar fasciitis once and for all.  I wasted not only years sitting at home and on the sidelines because of plantar fasciitis but I wasted hundreds of dollars of my hard earned cash on doctors, podiatrists, custom orthotic shoes and inserts and even cortisone shots.  But all they did was take away my money and not my pain.

It wasn’t until I learned 5 simple, easy-to-follow techniques that you can do from the comfort of your own home, sitting in your comfy chair watching your favourite TV show – without the need for any medical gadgets or gimmicks.

Today, I want to reveal them to you!  Simply click on the button below and let me show you just how easy it is!

walking plantar fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis Cure

May 19, 2011 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

Most people don’t fully understand the impact of suffering an injury until it keeps them from participating in their  favorite sport or activity.  But things can get even more serious when it affects your daily life to the point that you have to depend on others for help.  Sadly, this can be the case if you suffer from plantar fasciitis.  For people who suffer from this terrible condition, they will almost go to any means or end to cure it once and for all.

There is no positive relationship between the amount of money you spend trying to cure plantar fasciitis and the speed at which you will recover.  But curing your stubborn and nagging foot pain for good can be incredibly simple, if you are armed with the right information and a proven, step-by-step program.

So what exactly is plantar fasciitis and why does it hurt so much?

The term plantar fasciitis in general terms is inflammation of the bottom of the foot.  The term “itis” actually means inflammation and plantar is the term for the bottom of the foot.  The foot fascia is a thin fibrous band of tissue that starts at the base of your toes and runs along the bottom of your foot and connects again at your heel bone.  Plantar fasciitis is a repetitive strain injury which means that an injury occurs to a specific part of the body that tends to get overworked and put under excess strain or pressure over a long period of time.  Repetitive strain injuries rarely occur or develop overnight but can occur from blunt force trauma or direct blow to the area.

As with a plantar fasciitis injury, the foot fascia becomes stressed and eventually breaks down and develops small micro tears.  As you continue to spend time on your feet, the tears can get larger which results in a continous cycle of inflammation and swelling.  This is when the true pain is felt by plantar fasciitis sufferers and it’s only then that they seek out a cure for their disability.

So what could actually be the cause of your plantar fasciitis?

If you have any of the following conditions apply to you, then look no further for the true cause of your plantar fasciitis pain:  being overweight, flat or high arches, weak foot muscles, a recent increase in physical activity, you stand in one place on a hard surface for many hours day after day, improper shoes for the surface you stand, walk or run on, or excessive foot pronation(you roll your ankle/foot outwards when you walk).

One of the tell tale signs of plantar fasciitis is foot pain when you wake in the morning.  If when you wake in the morning and the first few steps you take feels like you are walking on broken glass, I can say with 99% accuracy that you are suffering from plantar fasciitis and should seek a cure quickly.  The reason being is that the longer you wait to treat a condition such as plantar fasciitis, the worse your injury can get and the longer your recovery can take.

So what’s the fastest, fail-proof method on how to cure plantar fasciitis so you can get back on your feet enjoying your favorite sports or activity again?

As someone who’s suffered from plantar fasciitis, I can tell you that you don’t have to waste hundreds of dollars, like I did, on doctors, podiatrists, custom orthotic shoes, shoe inserts or anti-inflammatory pills or creams.

If you are completely fed up with your foot pain and are serious about curing your plantar fasciitis for good, all you really need are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do at home, sitting in your comfy chair watching your favorite TV show without any medical gadgets or special exercise equipment.

curing plantar fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis Untreated

May 10, 2011 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

We all know that when it comes to injuries, prevention is much better than having to try to recover from an injury.  But when you suffer an injury, the worse thing you can do is let it go untreated.  And it’s no different if you let an injury such as plantar fasciitis go untreated.

So what’s the “big deal” about not treating your plantar fasciitis?  Won’t it just get better on it’s own with a little rest and TLC?

As with most repetitive strain injuries, the longer you wait to get treatment, the worse your condition gets and potentially the longer your recovery can take.  So why is this the case?  Can’t plantar fasciitis heal on it’s own?

Before we get into why when left untreated, your foot pain and plantar fasciitis can get worse, we should first define what exactly is plantar fasciitis and why it hurts so much!  Plantar fasciitis is the most commonly reported type of repetitive strain injury that affects the foot.  It’s basically inflammation of the plantar fascia.  The plantar fascia is a thin fibrous band of tissue that connects at your heel bone, runs along the bottom of your foot and connects again at the base of your toes.

One of the most frustrating things about plantar fasciitis is that the bottom of your foot is almost never tender to the touch and it’s not until you actually put weight on your foot that the true pain starts to hit.

Plantar fasciitis is not an injury that simply develops overnight.  As with all repetitive strain injuries, they occur over and extended period of time and usually start out as a mild, dull aching pain.  You may think that you can “deal with” or “put up” with the pain now but when it’s left untreated, plantar fasciitis gets significantly worse.  The reason why is that many sufferers continue on with the activities that caused their injury in the first place instead of taking proactive and preventative measures so that their condition doesn’t get worse.

As someone who’s suffered from plantar fasciitis and literally spent an entire summer sitting inside with my feet up because my foot pain was so bad, I know how stubborn an injury this is to overcome and get complete relief from.  But I can tell you that you don’t have to shell out hundreds of dollars to get permanent relief from plantar fasciitis.

Forget about forking out money for custom orthotic shoes or inserts, visits to doctors, podiatrists, washing down anti-inflammatories on a daily basis that only mask your pain, plantar fasciitis taping, and never worry about getting painful cortisone shots in your foot.

In fact, you don’t even have to leave the comfort of your own home to cure plantar fasciitis.   So now you have no reason to let it go untreated!

To be straight up-front with you, all it really takes to completely eliminate your nagging and stubborn foot pain and plantar fasciitis are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do from the comfort of your own living room, sitting in your comfy chair watching your favorite television show, without any special exercise equipment or gadgets!

untreat plantar fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis or Gout

May 6, 2011 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

At some point in your life, you’re bound to suffer from foot pain.  Perhaps a day after a long hike, running, or a day trip to Disneyland with the kids, it’s not uncommon to experience some foot discomfort and swelling.  But if this foot pain goes on past 2 days, then there is most likely something a little more serious going on.  Plantar fasciitis or gout are two of the most commonly reported foot injuries.

Let’s take a look at what makes them similar and how to tell them apart, before we jump straight into the best plantar fasciitis treatment and ways to treat gout.

First what is gout?  Gout is often referred to as gouty arthritis.  It is described as red, hot, quick, onset pain and inflammation of the joints.  It particular affects the joints in the feet.  It most commonly affects men over the age of 40.  Gouty arthritis of the foot can be diagnosed and discovered by finding uric acid crystals in joint fluid.  Overtime, these uric acid crystals get larger in numbers and eventually cause swelling and inflammation of the joints in your foot.

As the number of gout attacks increase, so does the damage to your joints which can develop into chronic arthritis.

What are some causes of gout?  Some things you can control and others are totally out of your hands.  For example, if you are a Black American, British, or parents have suffered from gout – your chances go up significantly, as much as 20% higher!  If you drink a lot of beer and enjoy a diet that is rich in red meats, internal organs, yeast, and oily fish, then your risk for gout  increases.  Taking certain types of medications can put you at a higher risk as well.  Medications such as blood pressure pills, diuretics, aspirin, nicotinic acid, allopurinal, probenecid and cyclosporin A can all increase your chances of suffering from gout.

But what about plantar fasciitis?  Where gout affects the joints of the foot, plantar fasciitis is pain and inflammation of the plantar fascia, more commonly referred to as the bottom of the foot.  Plantar fasciitis is a repetitive strain injury that develops over an extended period of time and rarely develops overnight.  The plantar fascia is a thin band of tissue that connects at your heel bone and runs along the bottom of your foot and connects again at the base of your toes.

There are many plantar fasciitis symptoms but some of the more frequently reported include: heel pain when you first step out of bed in the morning.  It may feel as if you are walking on broken glass.  Foot pain that is located at the center of your heel when you put weight on your foot.  A slight pulling sensation in your heel.  A dull aching or sharp, burning pain in the bottom of your foot.

If any of the above symptoms sound all too familiar to you, then there is a good chance that you are suffering from plantar fasciitis and not gout.

So what is the best, quickest and most effective way to treat plantar fasciitis?  Well, I can tell you that as someone who’s suffered from plantar fasciitis, I can tell you that there is no positive relationship between the amount of money you spend and the speed at which the pain disappears.  To be frank, doctors, podiatrists, massage therapy, cortisone shots, and custom orthotic shoes will only take away your money and not your foot pain, gout or plantar fasciitis!

In fact, all it really takes to completely cure and treat plantar fasciitis are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do from the comfort of your own living room, while sitting in your comfy chair watching your favorite television show – without any special exercise equipment or gadgets!

gout or plantar fasciitis

Heal Plantar Fasciitis

May 3, 2011 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

If you suffer from plantar fasciitis, you know that each step you take out of bed in the morning is like you are walking on broken glass!  But did you know that you can heal plantar fasciitis quickly using 5 simple steps that will make each step you take out of bed each morning, feel like you are walking on a warm sandy beach?  And the best part is that you don’t even have to leave the comfort and convenience of your own home!

But before I reveal these 5 simple, step-by-step techniques, why is it that so many people go on suffering, endlessly with plantar fasciitis to the point that they pretty much give up hope of ever getting permanent foot pain relief?

Look no further than your local Doctor or GP.  There has been a long heated debate in the medically community about what exactly causes plantar fasciitis but of more concern is how often doctor’s contradict each other when it comes to this repetitive strain injury.  To be more specific, doctors and the medical community often use the terms plantar fasciitis and heel spurs synonymously to describe foot pain.   To the average plantar fasciitis sufferer this makes things even more confusing and misleading.

So which is it, plantar fasciitis or heel spurs?

If you’ve wondered what the real secret is to healing plantar fasciitis, you must first know that heel spurs are actually a side effect of plantar fasciitis.  It’s also important to note that heel spurs only occur or develop after your foot fascia becomes inflamed.  A heel spur is actually new bone that forms on the bottom of your heel but strangely enough are not painful.  When your plantar fasciitis has been cured, heel spurs can still be seen on an x-ray.

Another challenge when trying to heal your nagging and plantar fasciitis is that doctors often contradict each other.  For example, you may visit one doctor and they will tell you that you have flat feet and that this is the cause of your foot pain.  You could then literally walk across the street and another doctor will tell you that you have high arches and that this is why you have foot pain.  So how do you even expect to fully heal your stubborn foot pain when doctors can’t even get it right?

Well, let me make easy for you!

As someone who’s “walked in your shoes” and knows the knee buckling pain of plantar fasciitis, you don’t need to shell out hundreds of dollars of your hard earned cash on doctors, podiatrists, cortisone injections, anti-inflammatory pills or expensive, custom orthotic shoes or inserts to eliminate your foot pain.  All they will do is take your money and not your pain!

In fact, you don’t even have to leave the comfort and convenience of your comfy chair to perform easy plantar fasciitis stretches!  To be brutally honest and up front with you, all it really takes to completely heal your foot pain are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do at home while sitting in your comfy chair, watching your favorite television show – without any special exercise equipment or gadgets!

healing plantar fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis Prevention

April 30, 2011 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

Many people don’t give a second thought to injury prevention until an injury happens to you.  The majority of our injuries can be prevented if we only took the time to think about the consequences and how significant of an impact in can have on our daily lives.  So for sufferers of plantar fasciitis pain, prevention is key when you have successfully recovered so you don’t re-injure your foot again.

Before we jump into preventative measures that you can take for plantar fasciitis, it’s important to first learn more about this stubborn injury that affects millions of people every year.

Plantar fasciitis in laymen terms is inflammation and irritation of the plantar fascia.  The plantar fascia is a thin band of tissue that starts at the heel bone and runs along the bottom of the foot and fans out to attach at the base of your toes.  It’s a repetitive strain injury which means it develops over an extended period of time and rarely occurs overnight.

Although there are many plantar fasciitis symptoms, the causes can be attributed to some of the following:

  1. A sudden increase in your level of physical activity
  2. Acute and direct trauma or blow to the bottom of your foot
  3. Extended periods of standing on hard surfaces, in one place
  4. Wearing shoes that do not provide the proper support for the surface you are standing, walking or running on
  5. A change in your normal bio-mechanical foot motion due to an increase in physical activity or starting a new sport or activity
  6. Already existing muscle, tendon or ligament imbalances from your ankle all the way up to your buttocks
  7. Performing repetitive actions, tasks or activities that stress the muscles in your feet or legs
  8. Being overweight
  9. Excessive foot pronation
  10. Flat or extremely high foot arches
  11. Poorly conditioned and weak foot muscles

The above are the most common causes of plantar fasciitis but this list is not the end all, be all.

You should know that there are specific tasks, activities, jobs and careers that are considered high risk when it comes to developing plantar fasciitis.  If you are in the following list, you should know that prevention is of the utmost importance!

The high risk group includes:

  • Nurses
  • Postal workers
  • Factory workers
  • Runners
  • Football players
  • Soccer players
  • Cashiers
  • Hairdressers
  • Dental assistants
  • Anyone who spends upwards of 8 hours a day on their feet, or job requires them to stand in one place for extended periods of time

Now I must issue a warning to those who think that you can prevent your plantar fasciitis from getting worse by simply taking the wait and see approach.  The truth of the matter is that, plantar fasciitis gets worse the longer you wait to treat it!

But here’s some good news!  You don’t have to spend hundreds of dollars of your hard earned cash on doctors, podiatrists, custom orthotic shoes, cortisone shots, or anti-inflammatory pills, which only take away your money and not your pain, to get plantar fasciitis relief.

In fact, the best prevention of plantar fasciitis is to strengthen your foot fascia using simple plantar fasciitis exercises, and the best part is that you can do them at home!

This much is true … if you are suffering from plantar fasciitis right now or want to prevent it from happening to your, all it really takes are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do from the comfort of your own living room, while sitting in your comfy chair watching your favorite television show, without any special exercise equipment or gadgets!

prevent plantar fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis Location

April 27, 2011 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

For those who suffer from foot pain, besides the excruciating pain, one of the most frustrating aspects is that you are unable to participate in your favorite sports or hobbies.  One of the most common types of foot pain is plantar fasciitis.  If you ever want to fully recover from a bout of plantar fasciitis, it’s important to learn the exact location of the plantar fascia.

Plantar fasciitis is the most commonly reported type of repetitive strain injury that affects the foot.  The medical community refers to plantar fasciitis as inflammation of the plantar fascia.  The foot fascia is a thin band of fibrous tissue that attaches at the heel bone and then runs along the bottom of your foot and attaches again at the base of your toes.  It is fanned shaped with the skinnier part at the heel and then fanning out as it reaches the base of your toes.

So now you know how to locate your plantar fascia, what are some other signs, symptoms, causes and best plantar fasciitis treatment?

Signs and symptoms of plantar fasciitis can vary from sufferer to sufferer but the most commonly reported include:

  • a pulling sensation or tight feeling in your heel
  • foot pain that is located at the center of your heel when you put pressure on your foot or stand
  • a dull aching, sharp pain or burning sensation in your heel
  • foot and center heel pain when you take the first few steps out of bed in the morning

If you can relate to any of the above symptoms, there is a good chance that you are suffering from plantar fasciitis.

But what about plantar fasciitis causes?

There are many but here are a few that you may want to investigate, as they may indeed be the root cause of your foot pain:

  1. Carrying too much body weight
  2. weak foot muscles
  3. poor shoe support for surfaces you stand, run or walk on frequently
  4. excessive foot pronation
  5. high arches or flat feet
  6. frequent and extended periods of standing on hard surfaces in one place

Now while locating your plantar fasciitis is not that important, the treatment option that you choose is!  The problem that many sufferers face is that doctors often contradict each other when offering advice on how to treat it.  You may visit one doctor and they may tell you that you have flat feet and then visit another doctor across the street and they will say you have high arches.  Also, doctors often refer to plantar fasciitis as heel spurs.  When in fact, heel spurs ONLY occur once you’ve suffered a bout of plantar fasciitis.

Even though plantar fasciitis location is easy to find, what you really need is a proven system to cure your nagging and stubborn foot pain once and for all, so you can get back to your favorite activities and hobbies again without pain.

For those who are serious about eliminating their foot pain and plantar fasciitis, all it really takes are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do from the comfort of home, sitting in your comfy chair, without the need for any special exercise equipment or gadgets!

plantar fasciitis locating

Plantar Fasciitis or Heel Spurs

April 15, 2011 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

If you’ve been suffering with foot pain for sometime now, you must know that there is something a little more serious going on with your foot/feet.  And hopefully, you’re ready to take some proactive measures and make a commitment to get rid of your foot pain once and for all.

But the question still remains.  Which type of foot injury are you suffering from, plantar fasciitis or heel spurs?  Are these two totally different injuries or does one “go” with the other?  Are heel spurs the cause of plantar fasciitis?

Before we decide what it is exactly you are suffering from, it’s important to first learn more about this nagging and stubborn pain you have on the bottom of your foot/feet.

Plantar fasciitis is a repetitive strain injury whereby you have inflammation of the plantar fascia.  In fact “itis” means inflammation.  The plantar fascia is a thin band of tissue that connects at your heel bone and runs along the bottom of your foot and connects at the other end of your foot, at the base of your toes.

You may find that the bottom of your foot, the fascia, is not tender to the touch.  It’s not until you bear weight on your foot that the true pain and discomfort is felt.  Like many repetitive strain injuries, plantar fasciitis does not usually develop over night, it occurs over an extended period of time.  There are many plantar fasciitis causes but heel spurs is not one of them!

This when things can get a little confusing, simply because sufferers are so miss informed about the relationship between plantar fasciitis and a heel spur.  And it’s not your fault.  Generally accepted medical literature has often been using the term ‘heel spurs’ proportionately to define plantar fasciitis as well.  Hence the reason many plantar fasciitis go on suffering, unfortunately for many years which doesn’t have to happen.  Here’s why…

Heel spurs only form after you’ve suffered a plantar fasciitis injury.  A heel spur is a spike like projection that is not usually painful.  And even when you fully recover from plantar fasciitis, your heel spur can still be present and been seen with an x-ray only.

So what does this all mean for you?  Well, the good news is that regardless of whether you have a heel spur or not, one thing is for sure.  You are suffering from plantar fasciitis.  So what’s the fastest and best way to treat it? Does plantar fasciitis home treatment actually work or even exist?

Well as someone who has walked in your shoes and suffered from plantar fasciitis, I can tell you what won’t work.

You don’t have to shell out hundreds of dollars of your hard earned cash on doctors, podiatrists, orthotic shoes or eat anti-inflammatories on a daily basis to mask the pain.  Heck, you can implement simple plantar fasciitis stretches and you don’t even have to leave your home.

In fact, all it really takes to completely eliminate your heel spurs and plantar fasciitis are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do from the comfort of your own living room, watching your favorite television show without any special exercise equipment.

plantar fasciitis and heel spurs

Plantar Fasciitis Leg Pain

April 11, 2011 by  
Filed under plantar-fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis affects millions of people every year.  Reports of this injury tend to increase in the spring when we tend to spend more time outdoors.  But what if your painful plantar fasciitis also causes leg pain.  Does this mean you have a more severe case of plantar fasciitis or could it be something else that you need to worry about?

What many sufferers of plantar fasciitis don’t realize is that if you have an injury, imbalance or restrictions any where from you foot to your hamstrings, this can be a contributing factor to your plantar fasciitis pain.

While it’s true that plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the plantar fascia, it usually takes a long period of time to develop.  It’s not an injury that simply comes on overnight.  Remember, it’s a repetitive strain injury.

People who experience leg pain combined with plantar fasciitis pain, most likely already have some sort of muscle restriction or imbalance in their leg.  For example, if you are a pronator, there is a good possibility that you will have the following 3 muscle restrictions:

  1. Hamstring restrictions in the biceps femoris, semitendinosus and semimembranosus muscles
  2. Calf muscle restrictions in the gastrocnemius and soleus
  3. Quadricep restrictions

It has also been noted that if you have problems with your hip, ie: external or internal hip rotators, this could also be a contributing factor to your plantar fasciitis and leg pain.

If you can successfully eliminate the existing muscle imbalances and restrictions that already pre-exist then your chances of a complete recovery from plantar fasciitis increase significantly.  So you’re not going to eliminate these restrictions by wearing custom orthotic shoes or taking anti-inflammatories to mask your pain.

If you have plantar fasciitis flat feet, this is not a problem when trying to overcome plantar fasciitis.  Flat feet is NOT the cause of plantar fasciitis.

So what is the best plantar fasciitis treatment that can get to the root cause of your foot pain and help repair any muscle imbalances that you may have?

Well, you don’t have to waste hundreds of dollars of your hard earned cash going back and forth to doctors, podiatrists or physical therapy appointments.  Forget about washing down fistfuls of anti-inflammatories on a daily basis that really only mask your pain for a few hours.  Never ever worry about invasive plantar foot surgery or painful cortisone shots in your foot.

In fact, the cure for plantar fasciitis and leg pain is incredibly simple!

All it really takes are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques that you can do from the comfort of your own living room, while watching your favorite television show without the need for any special exercise equipment or gadgets!

plantar fasciitis painful legs

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